food symposium and a few spots left in my writing workshop on saturday!

 DSC00832
The fourth annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium will be held May 7-9, 2015, and if you’re interested in food (which I assume you are, given your choice of reading material) and free talks, you’ll be happy to know we’re welcoming back to Eugene the enchanting keynote author, Diana Abu-Jaber.  She’ll be presenting and empanelled with urban farmer extraordinaire Novella Carpenter and Sista Vegan Project’s founder Dr. Breeze Harper.  My students and I have just finished reading Carpenter’s Farm City in my New Farmer’s Movement class (COLT 305), so I’m excited to chat with her at a public conversation on May 8 at 1 p.m. and see slides of the farm and all her work.  For more details about the many events of the Symposium, click the link above.

I’d also like to encourage you to snap up the last few slots for the free, open to all, writing workshops being offered through the Symposium.  Two are still open, including mine, and both seek to diversify food writing by using very different approaches. I’d love to have you join us, especially if your own perspective is lacking in today’s food media.  Descriptions below.  Workshops take place on May 9, from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. at the downtown Eugene Public Library at 10th and Olive (100 W. 10th St.). To reserve a slot, call the Eugene Public Library ASAP at 541-682-5450 (Press 2).

1)  “Food beyond Foodie: Strengthening and Diversifying Food Writing for Publishing,” taught by Prof. Jennifer Burns Bright, columnist at Eugene Magazine and sole proprietor of the award-winning blog, Culinaria Eugenius. She moonlights as a travel and food writer while teaching literature and food studies at the University of Oregon, writing about anything from Dutch pickles for NPR to Russian dumplings for AAA’s Via magazine.

Workshop Description: Blogs and magazine writing tend to present food as conservative, traditional, and overly sweet. We will explore techniques to make your own individuality heard in its grumpy, queer, unsavory, messy, aged, or just plain weird glory. We’ll seek to strengthen your critical voice, define your own taste, and attract audiences with more diverse lives or particular interests, all the while taking inspiration from unconventional food writers who broke the mold. Please bring a piece you’re working on or ideas for a story.

2) “Narrating Racial [In]Justice Through Critical Food Writing,” taught by Dr. Breeze Harper. Breeze Harper edited the anthology Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak On Food, Identity, Health, and Society and is the author of the social justice novel Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (2014). Her blog is The Sistah Vegan Project. Workshop Description: In this workshop, participants will use food writing to explore their own personal experiences with racial injustice as well as anti-racism activism. The workshop is an outlet for those who love critical food writing/reading and have experienced the frustration and pain of being survivors of racism and/or are anti-racist activists.

Image is a mural outside the Port Orford Co-op.  A supermarket in Oregon.  I love this artist’s unique imagination.  I smile every single time I see it.  Leeks in the waves!  Watermelons washing ashore!  What peaches and what penumbras!

Advertisements

lane county fair 2014

IMG_5966

I’m a big fan of the county fair.  You can see the entire set of my photos here.  This was the first year I’ve been able to go and wander at my leisure, neither being in a wheelchair nor overscheduled, as I have been in past fairs.  And it wasn’t 90 degrees yesterday, another big plus.

If you do go, be sure to see the animals the 4-H kids have raised and all the exhibits indoors.  That’s really what the fair’s about, not the Zipper and deep-fried candy.  We’re struggling to keep the Lane County Extension 4-H programming alive due to budget cuts, so awareness and appreciation of all the good things that come from agriculture and animal husbandry education are essential.  All the baking, preservation, art, and gardening exhibits include kids’ divisions.

IMG_8197 IMG_5879 IMG_5988I noticed this year’s fair has a slightly — slightly — more conservationist quality to it.  Didn’t see the religious trailer “ARE YOU GOING TO HEAVEN?!” and there were only a few Confederate flags flying next to the gay pride and legalize pot ones.  And there was a family farm booth.  Plus, of course, the Master Food Preservers, Master Gardeners, book vendors, and MECCA’s reuse booth.  And education about the environment and animals via the parrot pirate and the sea lion show…well, there’s that.

PS.  Note to roasted corn boss: let the servers roast the corn properly.  It was only roasted on the outside, and corn, like life, is improved with a little char. Love, CE.

antique pastas? I’m in: summer mfp classes

10446323_10201999417762520_8090612193962554389_oI wanted to share a very special event, a benefit for the Master Food Preserver program of OSU Extension Service-Lane County with Chef Rosa Mariotti!

She’s planning a hands-on Italian lunch on Saturday, July 12 at the Community of Christ Church, 1485 Gilham Road, Eugene, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.  

Please call right away to leave a message (details below) if you’d like to attend.  We’re finalizing the details and need a head count.

What’s really special about this lunch is the menu.  Chef Rosa shared with me a description of an old pasta form that will be featured called stracenate, an egg-enriched, wheat pasta (see pic): “Giuliano Bugialli in Bugialli on Pasta [1988] describes stracenate (also called stracnar) as ‘attractive pasta rectangles, which are patterned in herringbone with a suggestive antique board called a cavarola.'”

Because of the time it takes to make these shapes, stracnar-making is a skill that’s being lost in Italy and rarely (if ever) seen in America.  This might be your only chance to learn how to make them!

The Master Food Preservers of Lane County are once again going strong.  We graduated a class of 19 energetic, friendly, certified MFP volunteers this year, and we’re hosting the hotline for part of the week, splitting the considerable work with Douglas County.

Updated Menu

Homemade Pasta: Spinach/Plain Fettuccini and Stracnar
Scarpetta Sauce (tomato and mascarpone with butter)
Salad with Edible Flowers and Berry Vinaigrette
Chicken alla Mugnaia with Preserved Lemons
Italian Grissoni
Homemade Butter
Pecan Shortbread Cookies w/ Mascarpone & Gooseberry Sauce

Pre-registration is required, $65 per person and the class is limited to 15. For information, register here ASAP at 541-344-4885 or stop by the new OSU Extension office at 996 Jefferson St. to register and pay. Office open Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 5 p.m.

By the way, pressure canner gauge testing and Clear Jel are available in the OSU Extension Office.  Testing is $5 each lid, and Clear Jel is available for $4/lb. or $12/4 lbs. Prepare to leave equipment to be tested for several days; testing is done as volunteers are in the office. Canner parts can be found at hardware stores, Bi-Mart, and other stores that sell canning supplies.

Want to learn canning?  Registration form (including credit card payment) for all the classes is here or call 541-344-4885 with questions.

  • July 19, 2014 – Jam Session! 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($60)  Community of Christ Church, 1485 Gilham Road, Eugene.
  • August 16, 2014 – Pickle Passion! 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($60) Community of Christ Church, 1485 Gilham Road, Eugene.
  • September 6, 2014 – Tuna Workshop – 10 a.m. to about 4 p.m. when done.  Class will be held at FOOD for Lane County, 770 Bailey Hill Rd., Eugene. $60 plus cost of tuna. Cost of tuna will be paid day of class by cash or check based on current market price.

 

next week’s dream team: food historian charlotte biltekoff visits, farmer paul atkinson chats

I’m pleased to announce the University of Oregon Center for the Study of Women in Society Food in the Field Research Interest Group Visiting Scholar Lecture for AY 13-14.  Dr. Charlotte Biltekoff, Assistant Professor, American Studies/Food Science and Technology at the University of California at Davis, will be speaking on her forthcoming book, Eating Right in America: The Cultural Politics of Dietary Health, on Friday, April 19, 2013 at 3:30 p.m. in Lillis 111. The talk is free and open to all.  Yes, parking is difficult near campus; sorry.

1304_Biltekoff_flyer_WEBDr. Biltekoff’s book is an important contribution to the field; it analyzes the relationship between moral campaigns and food reform movements in American history.  Trust me, this is a fascinating topic. Our breakfast cereal industry was founded on a thoroughly American mix of sexual abstinence, fresh air exercise, and commercial crop potential.  And that’s just the beginning.

And you may be interested to note that Dr. Biltekoff has served in leadership roles in the burgeoning Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science at UC-Davis and the Association for the Study of Food and Society, so she’s a great person to chat with about the future of the field as well as the past.

We’ll be hearing more about the upcoming talk on Food for Thought on KLCC, Sunday at noon (PST) on 89.7FM in Eugene, or its sister stations all across Oregon, or live on the web.

img_5252And if that’s not enough to grab your attention, how about our other guest on this week’s show, farmer Paul Atkinson of Laughing Stock farm? YES!

Renowned on the West Coast for his pork (which is simply the best pork I’ve ever eaten, and everyone from Chez Panisse diners to The Atlantic’s Senior Editor Corby Kummer agrees) and famous on this blog for his work with friend Del Del Guercio making goat milk cheese and cured meats on the farm for local consumption (as in so-local-it-fell-into-my-mouth local), Farmer Paul will be in our studio!  He’ll chat about the other white meat, dairy farming, duck eggs, heritage squash, land use, curing caves, WWOOFing, and/or who knows what else with Ryan and me at noon.  This is a show that should not be missed.