new regional chinese restaurants in eugene!

IMG_9294In 221 B.C.E., warring states were unified into what became the nation of China.  In 2014 C.E., two new regional Chinese restaurants were opened in the People’s Republic of Eugene.

Joining Kung Fu Bistro, the Sichuan spot which continues to get raves for its cumin-fried fish on Willamette, and the odd Teriyaki Boy on 13th with its special Chinese menu, are two exciting new places.

IMG_9298IMG_9295Tasty Chongqing (Broadway near the Ferry Street Bridge in the building formerly occupied by Café Arirang) is a modest student eatery that is named after a relatively new province to the east of Sichuan province, which which it shares many culinary traditions.  The restaurant specializes in hot and cold snacks, hot pots, noodle dishes, and yes, FINALLY, Sichuan-style spicy steamed dumplings (above).

IMG_9305 IMG_9306221 B.C.E. has an unusual name that points to a significant date in Chinese history.  The owners hail from Shaanxi province, which lies north of Chongqing and is famous for the terra cotta army buried with Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who unified China in that fateful year. This little modern two-storied noodle shop has just opened in a new building at 13th and Patterson (which might be the hottest restaurant corner in town, with two new restaurants opened and a Sushi Island in the works).

The restaurant is currently serving a limited menu as they work the kinks out, but already popular for its thick, chewy hand-shaved wheat noodles, served in a bowl with simple toppings like egg and tomato or more rich and decadent, like the braised pork chunks with spicy chile flakes.  In my opinion, these are the best noodles in town.  Also available are rou jia mo, sometimes called a “hamburger” of fillings like cumin beef on a steamed bun, and more creative offerings like snacks of duck necks and pork bungs.  I didn’t ask.

Neither restaurant seems to have a website or Facebook page, but I did chat with the owners and they told me they’ve had success with restaurants in Washington (Tasty Chongqing) and on the East Coast (221 B.C.E.).  Both joints were already stuffed with Chinese UO students.  I’m looking forward to spending many more meals there.

Welcome to Eugene!  We’ve been waiting!

P.S. As the cuisine in Eugene gets more diverse and sophisticated, it’s worth your while to learn more about the dishes of central China and their wheat-based noodle-y cuisine to enjoy these spots.  Read up on the food of Sichuan province and Shaanxi province before checking them out.  Very helpful articles!

 

fermented sichuan green beans or long beans

IMG_4042 IMG_5314Even the most stalwart food tinkerer can fixate on a single dish; indeed, it’s our calling card to cooking.  For me, it was fermented green beans.  I couldn’t resist the soured, greenbeany niblets of long beans in a Sichuan dish I had in Cambridge’s Kendall Square (the now sadly defunct Thailand Café) last spring.  Long beans are what string beans fantasize of being.  Sometimes called yard-long beans, they are good in Thai and Chinese stirfries.  I often use them in curries.

So sour grapes, er, rather, sour fermented beans were definitely a goal.  Minced pork with sour beans is a well known Sichuan dish, so as soon as I returned home, I made quicklike for my Fuchsia Dunlop library and immediately put up a quart of the beans in the manner she suggested: full of warm spices and punchiness like rice wine, ginger, star anise, Sichuan peppercorns, etc.

Complete failure.

The alcohol inhibited the fermentation, so it turned olive grey and salty, but never achieved the sourness I was seeking. The ginger tasted weird.  The other spices were a distraction, but I wasn’t sure if they were the problem.

So I tried again without alcohol and ginger.  Still bad.

So I tried yet again, but this time sticking with the pure flavors of beans and salt.  Much better, but I had been keeping the beans whole, which created an odd, rubbery texture.  I had thought that it would help them stay intact and not quite so salty, but the tradeoff was not worth it.  And since Germans slice and pound beans in the fermentation process for sour string beans (and when have the Germans done anything wrong?), I thought I’d give it a try.

In the final batch, I chopped the beans into small pieces.  I added quite a bit of garlic, and there they were: delicious, sour, flavorful beans.  They were indeed a bit salty, so rinsing or soaking them before stirfrying them and declining any more salt or soy sauce in the dish is a good idea. The longer they sit in the refrigerator, the saltier they will get.  I ended up quickpickling more beans in the remaining brine, and they were good, too.

The soured beans were stirfried with some fresh green beans, ripe red pepper, and a beautiful variety of burgundy leafy greens sourced from Good Food Easy and Adaptive Seeds along with the minced pork.  No other seasonings needed except for a cube of frozen chicken stock for sauciness. Delicious.

Fermented Green Beans

  • Enough beans to fill a quart jar half to 2/3 full when chopped into small pieces
  • 5-6 garlic cloves, lightly smashed
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon of whey, sauerkraut juice, kimchi juice, or any other similiar live ferment to help along the process (optional)

Chop beans and peel and smash garlic.  Add to jar.  Mix up a brine with one quart of hot water and sea salt, stirring to dissolve salt.  Pour brine over beans, add optional fermented juice, weigh down beans with a weight or similar so they are submerged in brine, and let sit on the counter for 5-7 days.  Taste for sourness.  When they are sour enough for you (I probably went for 9-10 days, in all honesty), refrigerate and let cure for a week before enjoying.  Rinse or soak beans to remove some of the salt before using in a stirfry.

fermented mustard greens

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To prepare for my fermentation class on Saturday, I’ve been experimenting with fermented vegetables in small batches.  We’re making sauerkraut and red and white kimchi, and tasting a range of wonderful ferments, including fermented mustard greens.

Although “Sichuan pickled vegetable” and “preserved mustard greens” (among other names) are widely available in Asian markets, I wanted to make my own using my garden-grown fresh mustard greens.  My greens lack the fleshy stem of the Chinese mustard green called jie cai (芥菜) in Mandarin or gai choy in Cantonese, but they are still tasty and very flexible.  They have a nice slight bitterness and spicy flavor, a great foil for bland noodles, white fish, pork belly or other fatty pork, and soups.

I’ve also used this recipe for fermented green beans for the wonderful Sichuan dish chopped sour beans with pork.  I don’t care for the ginger and other spices when used with green or long beans, so I just use salt and a little sugar.  I successfully froze slightly sour beans in their brine last summer and used them in stirfry dishes this winter.  Much better than the weird spongy flavor of frozen chopped green beans.

Note: I adapted this recipe very loosely from Fuchsia Dunlop’s pickled vegetable recipe, which appears in various forms in her Sichuan and Hunan cookbooks. Dunlop calls for rice wine or vodka in her original recipe.  As this would inhibit the fermentation process, I’ve removed it.

Sichuan Fermented Mustard Greens

  • 2 large bunches mustard greens
  • 1/4 cup coarse sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3-inch piece of peeled fresh ginger
  • 3-4 dried chiles (Facing Heaven variety, if you have them)
  • 1/2 star anise
  • 1/3 cinnamon stick
  • a tablespoon or two of live-culture sauerkraut (not processed) or fermented hot pepper juice or whey (optional, to speed fermentation)
  • a half-gallon or larger jar, two ziplock-style bags, and a piece of cheesecloth large enough to cover jar

Bring two cups of water, salt, and sugar to a boil; let salt dissolve and set aside to cool a bit.

Slice mustard greens into three or four big chunks.  Do not chop too finely or they will be harder to handle.

In a sterilized half-gallon sized (or larger) jar, add the chiles, star anise, cinnamon stick, and optional fermentation “starter” of sauerkraut or pepper juice or whey.  (Make sure this juice is from live-culture products with lacto-bacilli to inoculate the mixture or else it won’t work.) Then pack mustard greens into the jar, pressing down tightly.

Pour one cup of brine over the mustard greens, and the rest into a ziplock-style bag.  Place one bag into another bag and close both securely to ensure the brine won’t leak.  Use the bag as a weight in the jar to submerge the greens under the water.  If there isn’t enough brine to cover the greens, pour some of the brine in the bag into the jar.  You can use other methods (like a bowl or jar filled with water or river rock) as a weight, as well.

Cover jar with cheesecloth and let sit at room temperature for 3-7 days, testing daily after three days for your desired levels of sourness.  Skim any white film off the top of the water and remove green bits that have molded on top.

For storage, cover the jar with an airtight lid and refrigerate.  The quality will improve after another week or so in refrigeration, but will start to deteriorate after a month.

Before serving, chop into small pieces.  Great in soups, pork stir-fries, dumplings, fried rice, noodles, etc.

eats weeds and leaves: edible spring pruning

IMG_3152Hello!  Long time no see.  It’s planning season in academia, and I’ve been scrambling to pull together grants and reports and abstracts and introductions and applications.  Like so many young(ish) scholars working in adjunct positions, I’ve also been struggling with job instability and will be moving to a joint position teaching in English and Comparative Literature at the university in the fall.  Although I’m excited to work with colleagues I know and respect already (don’t forget Eugene is a small town, so this is like moving down the street), it will shift priorities for me as the new classes and structure will take up more time.  Some additional family financial pressures mean I will need to start prioritizing stability and writing much more, both for academic journals and professional food publications to make ends meet.  Having to move is a very real possibility.

Unfortunately, this will mean fewer events and volunteer projects for the community starting next year, and I’m deeply sorry about this.  It’s important to give back, and the pleasures of the volunteer work I do, including the radio show, this blog, the preservation classes, the events I host at the UO through my research group, the promotion of others’ work, and volunteering at festivals and reporting on my travels and such make life worth living in Eugene.  Don’t worry, I still have a few things planned for next year that are pretty fabulous.  But I need to “lean out,” as they say.

So the prospect of eating from the garden is suddenly even more appealing.  And it’s culling time, so here are some ideas.

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  • Fresh oregano salad, substituting oregano for fresh parsley in any tabbouli recipe, supposedly helps young people study in the Middle East.  And who doesn’t need to sharpen up the memory?  With the tender spring leaves tempered by spring onions and a lemon and olive oil dressing, you won’t be overwhelmed by the dark, musky flavor and woody stems.
  • Common snails. Yes, escargot.  I felt my gorge rise when I realized in France our garden pests — yes, the exact same variety — were one of the species used for escargot.  But Molly Watson has published a piece in Edible San Francisco that lays out how to prepare and cook them in a rather appetizing way.  And what with the foraging all around town making its way into local bistros…new business, anyone?
  • Any basket-weavers who are pruning?  Consider a traditional grilled fish basket made of Mediterranean bay branches (above image).  We lunched on delicious salmon prepared this way on our tour of Sunset magazine a few weeks back as part of the International Association of Culinary Professionals conference.  You might be able to do something similar with rosemary branches, if that’s your unruly hedge issue.
  • Dandelion greens can be wilted and used as a deeply flavorful green in a stirfry or potato curry, or try my fellow Oregon blogger Dr. Fugawe’s adaptation of Duguid’s Spiced Burmese New Potatoes with dandelion greens and shallot oil.

But where it’s really at is RAAB.  These are the tops of cruciferous vegetables that sweetly greenly provided iron-rich leaves all winter long, now bolting in the lovely sun.  The market gives us a bunch of them, all tasting basically the same once cooked, but some sharper, some darker when raw.  Try brussels sprouts raab or collards raab, my favorite (pictured first against tree — a very timely delivery by my beloved neighbor), or the lovely purple cabbage raab.

Easiest recipe?  Chop up a bunch of raab with its pretty yellow flowers and throw atop fried meat, like the utterly succulent chunks of bo ssam Biancalana pork shoulder I made the other day, before wrapping morsels in butter lettuce leaves.  But then there’s also

Pasta.  Try it chopped and sauteed in olive oil that has been warmed up with a little chopped garlic or culled green garlic from the garden, lemon zest, and red pepper flakes (add a little anchovy if you’re adventurous and/or wise).  Throw the cooked raab into a bowl of fresh pasta, something chunky like rotini, and grate fresh parmesano all over it.

You might also sample it steamed or fried with a little oyster sauce, just like the gai lan you see in dim sum houses.

Or little green potstickers, anyone?  Finely minced raab works especially well with ground pork as a filling.

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But best of all is this recipe for stir-fried chopped raab with pork and fermented red chili (above, photographed by the paparazzi).  It’s an adaptation of Fuchsia Dunlop’s Bo Bo Cai Xin, or Stir-fried Chopped Choy Sum, from her cookbook, Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking, that just came out in an American edition.  It’s a wonderful cookbook, with a big chapter on leafy greens that I’ve already explored extensively.

My palate is a bit duller than Dunlop’s so I usually use more spice and salt than she does.  You might decide on your own.  But either way, definitely use the pork if you’re a meat eater.  Although we sliced it thickly because of gluttony for Laughing Stock Farm pork and its delicious fat, I’d recommend mincing finely next time.  Another difference is that with raab, you don’t need to blanch ahead of time.  It’s much thinner and more tender than choy sum.  I also substituted my own fermented red ‘Facing Heaven’ chilis for plain red jalapenos, so the recipe reflects that.

Stir-fried Chopped Raab with Pork and Fermented Red Chili

Serves 2 with rice and Chinese pickles, but make several dishes and turn it into a party.

  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil, divided
  • 3 cups of chopped raab
  • 1 tablespoon chopped Sichuan fermented red chiles, or substitute finely chopped fresh red jalapeno or even red bell peppers
  • 1/2 pound ground pork or finely chopped pork shoulder meat, best quality
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped ginger
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 2 tablespoons spring onions (good use for culled onions from garden)
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons chili oil (optional)

Do all your chopping and measuring ahead of time, and set aside each ingredient in little bowls.  Heat wok to sizzling, then add a tablespoon of the peanut oil to heat, then quickly add the chopped raab and cook until bright green and still crunchy, just two minutes or so, then stir in red chiles.  Set aside in a serving dish.

Add rest of peanut oil, then add chopped or ground pork and a little salt.  As the pork loses its pink but is not yet completely cooked, add ginger and garlic.  When everything is nicely browned, add back the raab, stir to blend flavors and cook for a couple minutes more, then remove from heat, stir in sesame and chili oil, then serve with rice.

nose-to-tail eating in eugene

IMG_3012Surely not for the faint of heart, but a great pleasure for adventurous eaters: nose-to-tail cooking.  Popularized by British Chef Fergus Henderson, the concept asks cooks to honor the animal by consuming as much of it as possible.  This usually translates into sausages and terrines and soups, many European specialties, but there are also some wonderful options in Asian and Central American restaurants, too.  Many Americans find the idea of eating “the nasty bits,” as Anthony Bourdain calls them, revolting, but I think it’s worth our consideration as meat-eaters and ethical diners.

The duck chins, above, are Exhibit A.

IMG_3018At least with the larger mammals.  Tiny squid?  Well, it’s just pleasure to eat them whole.  Above, hotaru ika sushi at Kamitori, one of the finest preparations of squid I’ve ever eaten in my life.  Hotaru means firefly, and these little guys, about an inch or two long, bioluminesce in the dark water.  And since I’ve long suspected that squid were ruined for me after the most exquisite experience eating ika sashimi on a boat in the middle of the Sea of Japan, freshly hauled from the water, I’m so grateful.  Once again Chef Masa has filled me with unspeakable joy by serving sea creatures with respect and craft.  And no eyeballs, which were kindly removed.

Also, I was honored to join some of my students for an adventure this week at Spring Garden restaurant in Springfield, where we tried some of the more unusual items on the menu, including rabbit in a clay pot with ginger, salt-and-pepper fried chicken cartilage, stir-fried elk with onions and peppers, “saliva” chicken in a spicy sauce, and a dish that will horrify the local sportsfans among us, spicy duck chins with their little tongues a-waggin’ (top photo).  Below, you can see the English translation of the menu and the other dishes we enjoyed.

Spring Garden is a challenge, but it also has great possibilities on the Chinese menu even if you’re not into nose-to-tail cooking or exotic birds and reptiles.  You might also, if you must, order from the American menu with all the standards.  If you’re curious about the duck chins, which are of course the lower part of the duck bill, they are crunchy on the tip, and you eat the tongue, then pick at the meat at the base of the bill.  The chicken cartilage was crunchy, as expected; it was chopped into chunks and deep-fried in a batter lively with salt and Sichuan peppercorn, and decorated with chiles. Saliva chicken seemed to be steamed chicken in a spicy sauce — probably my favorite of all the dishes of the night.

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Spring Garden Chinese Restaurant on Urbanspoon

asian restaurants in eugene: a reevaluation

IMG_2947Finally, some movement on the Asian food scene in Eugene.  We’ve been waiting for years, and in the last two years or so, we’ve had some wonderful developments downtown and out in Springfield.

I say “Asian” as if it’s some unified front, and in Eugene, sometimes it is.  There’s a group of wonderfully industrious and creative Korean families who own not only the majority of the Korean restaurants in town, but the fusion noodle houses, most of the Japanese joints, and now Vietnamese pho places. (Not sure about the Thai restaurants!)

IMG_2563I love it, for example, that Bon Mi, the new bahn mi/pho place at Broadway and Pearl has a cold case with about a dozen homemade Korean kim chi takeout offerings.  Sometimes I order the spicy squid or cucumber and eat it with the best pho in town.  (The broth keeps getting better and better.)

And I’ve spoken at length about Café Arirang on E. Broadway at Ferry Street Bridge, the best Korean restaurant in town, and Noodle N Thai at 5th and Main in Springfield, the best Thai restaurant in town.

And yet.  The established restaurants make some assumptions about Eugene tastes, tastes I’ve been trying to combat for many years in my raising awareness blogging campaign:  Too sweet.  Too meat-heavy, too teriyaki. Huge portions of mediocre food.  Not spicy enough. Too Americanized. Lack of variation. All the stuff that healthy eaters and locavores and F-the-Food-System activists are also battling.  I’ve even undertaken a rather risky cross-town experiment in judging P.F. Chang’s against two popular Chinese dives.

I understand that the average Oregon palate has in the past leaned toward the sweet and meaty with lots of starch on the side, and therefore it is profitable to give the people what they want.  But offering a range of options is one way to educate the Oregonian not versed in different flavors, and perhaps more importantly from a business standpoint, to distinguish one’s restaurant from the other Asian-American places in town.

IMG_2730 IMG_2731There’s nothing wrong with the Eugene standby Toshi’s Ramen, for example, but I like it that there is new competition with decent ramen, Tokyo Ramen on 17th and Pearl, that has many more offerings and a charming interior.  (I’d like to see a gyoza battle occur so both places could improve their gyoza, but that’s just being selfish.)

I’ve noticed an influx of Chinese and Vietnamese students at the University, and there are flourishing Korean and Japanese communities in town.  And lo and behold, a growing Filipino population!  So, so, so happy that this is the case.

IMG_2981Because yes, restaurants are starting to meet the needs of these folks, and finally, the needs of those of us who aren’t of Asian heritage but really want the kind of food we eat in larger cities in the U. S. and abroad. We know how to use chopsticks, and we aren’t gastronomic rubes.  No, we may not want to eat chicken feet or duck intestines every day, but we do want to try them, and we want our food slightly sour or hot or or fermented instead of fried on the buffet, or swimming in sweet sauce.

Or if it’s a buffet and fried, serve us instead of sweet-n-sour pork the delicious lumpia and vinegar-garlic marinated milkfish I had the other day at the brand new Springfield mom-and-pop shop Maynila Filipino Cuisine on 32nd and Main.  The menu changes every day, but the pork adobo and delicious soups are there daily.  They also serve Filipino baked goods.  And fried cubes of pork belly.  (N.b.: vegetarians might struggle here.)

Let me say this again because it’s so monumental: an authentic, cheap, wonderful Filipino restaurant in the Eugene area.

So here’s my Call for Menus.  We want authentic standards that might not be considered exotic.  We want dim sum, nasi goreng, oyster pancake, saba shioyaki, and banh xeo.    We’re curious about the fish in the tank and the poultry on the roof and the herbs in the soup.

IMG_2626And we want good vegetables, too, and we’ll pay more for them.  You are welcome to scorn those of us who want a gloopy stew of cabbage, carrots, and scallion “stir-fry.”  Steamed broccoli?  No thanks.  We now grow bok choi and satsuma imo and gai lan and ginger and daikon in the southern Willamette Valley, and we would LOVE to see you cook with it.

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One of the most exciting discoveries I’ve made recently is close to home for me: good Chinese next to campus.  The special menu at Teriyaki Boy, 13th and Kincaid (next to QDoba), pictured in the first image on this page and the two above.  Teriyaki Boy is a chain, I believe, and serves sushi of average quality and a passable Chinese buffet.

But that’s not the reason to go.  The reason to go is the irrepressible spirit of someone wonderful in the kitchen, a chef who insisted on devising his own made-to-order menu.  It’s written on the hood over the buffet in back, and there are now cheat sheet menus by the register.  Here’s where you can get your offal on or sample some good Chinese comfort food, like fish bone and tofu soup, or Hainanese gingery garlicky green oniony steamed chicken on the bone.  For the less adventurous, the noodles and noodle soups are very good (the very first image is beef noodles), and I quite like the cumin beef, which lacks the ma la numbing quality of a good Sichuanese version, but I bet he’d add it if you (I) knew how to ask.  Is this the best Chinese food in the world?  No.  But it is head and shoulders above every other Chinese place I’ve tried in Eugene.  (Also worth a try is East Meets West a few doors down, if only for the dumplings. Pretty uneven quality, in my view, but I’ve had a decent dish or two for value prices.)

Oh, and Teriyaki Boy serves hot pot!  Half spicy and half not, or fully either, you can dip your meat and vegetables in a warming broth, kind of like a Chinese fondue.  Go with a group.

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Japanese, you say? (I’m always being asked where to get sushi in Eugene.) I’ve written at length about my favorite restaurant, Kamitori, one of the only Japanese-owned sushi joints in town and in my view, one of the only restaurants that could hold its own in a big city.  Chef Masa Itai trained internationally and sources his fish from the Oregon coast and Japan, among other places.  He has a keen eye and a spectacular palate.  He also doesn’t shy away from serving us unusual food.  For that I am grateful.  Above, you may recognize toro and amaebi and a snapper-family fish and Japanese anago, but the uni (sea urchin, bottom left) were the standout.  Given the size and slight roughness of the little guys, I’m positive these were hand-harvested instead of shipped from Japan in that little wooden box we’re all familiar with.  Quite frankly, I had never tasted uni like these in my life.

Chef Masa is always coming up with little surprises when you let him do his thing.  He serves beautiful standards, and adds treats when he finds them, like the giant clam nigiri below. For the next two weeks or so, he’s serving shirako, cod milt, in various forms for the adventurous.  I really enjoyed it with ponzu.  Hurry — it’s a Japanese delicacy and you won’t likely be able to get it anywhere else in Eugene, or perhaps even Oregon.

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I’m concerned about him, quite frankly, because of a chronic hand problem.  He had to stop serving sushi for lunch to rest it, but still offers sashimi and everything else for lunch, and sushi for dinner.  I had the only good katsudon (tonkatsu, pork cutlet, over rice with egg) in Eugene a couple of weeks ago at his restaurant.  He made it Japanese-style, with a raw egg that cooks over the piping hot pork cutlet just before you serve it.  If you usually like fried food, try it!

And then you’ll be an expert when Tokyo Tonkatsu, owned by the same folks who operate Tokyo Ramen, opens at Charnelton and Broadway (across from Noisette) this spring.  Here’s a note they’ve posted on their shop window:

IMG_2987Another notable sushi place in town doing creative things, but a very different animal from Kamitori, is Mame in the Whiteaker, which might appeal to those who like more creative, high-end fusion sushi for very decent prices.  I have to confess that the lima-bean interior makes me a little nauseous, but Chef Taro sources his fish carefully and is willing to play with his food.  He’s one to watch.  At a recent New Year’s Eve party at the restaurant, we had a selection of nigiri that included rare duck breast, toro with truffle, snapper with plum sauce, beef heart with sauerkraut, and monkfish liver with uni and scallion.  See?

IMG_4065I see!  So let’s see more of these types of innovative restaurants.  I’m loving every minute, and I really want to urge everyone who loves good food in Eugene to go try the new Asian offerings.  They need all of us to support them and let them know that their vision of an improved Eugene dining scene is shared by many of us.

Updated to add:  And if all that isn’t enough to convince you, I just had lunch a new Sichuan restaurant.

YES, A NEW SICHUAN RESTAURANT.  IN EUGENE.

IMG_2988Kung Fu Sichuan Bistro (an unfortunate name) is located in the same lot as Off the Waffle at 25th and Willamette, in the spot vacated by Som Tum Thai.  The owners have just moved here from Los Angeles, and the spot was packed with Chinese nationals, mostly students, when I was there.  In fact, there were only two white people in the restaurant, me and some skeezy older dude chatting up young women.  I spoke with two people about their own experiences in the week or so Kung Fu has been open, and they related similar crowds (well, maybe not the guy).  So. OMG, YES!

And the food is quite good. A bit salty, but a charge of ma la zinginess; what seemed to be real Sichuan peppers because they didn’t hold back and they weren’t as spicy as the regular Chinese red peppers; and a wide range of dishes on the menu, including hot pot in various variants, fried cumin fish, fish with a bath of chili sauce, pork with preserved vegetable, stir-fried potato threads, chicken with chilis, etc., etc., etc.  The mini dry pot with beef and peanuts and my standby dish, dry fried “Chef’s Special” green beans, are below.  You can see the full menu on Facebook.

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I cannot wait to explore this new place in its entirety.  Now, all we need is Ethiopian.

culinaria eugenius in indiana: mulberries and dumplings

 

Who snapped the most perfect picture when she was eating mulberries off a giant mulberry tree on the Indiana University campus and a lady with a black parasol in full Goth lace regalia strolled by? This girl.

And who found good Sichuan food in the middle of nowhere?  This girl. (At Lucky Express, a little hole-in-the-wall in Bloomington on 3rd.)

And who ate pickled herring at an Irish pub last night?  You guessed it.

Step it up, Eugene!