butcher your own meat, poison, and razor clams: psychopathy or just another episode of food for thought?

Camas Davis. Photo nicked from Chef’s Catalog

I might say both.  It’s Ryan and me again hosting another dark and dangerous episode of food radio programming for maniacs, Food for Thought on KLCC, today at noon (PST) on 89.7FM in Eugene, or its sister stations all across Oregon, or live on the web.

Updated:  Listen to the show’s archive here.

We’ll be chatting with Portland Meat Collective‘s Camas Davis, former food writer and butcher extraordinaire.  Isn’t she absolutely fiercely beautiful?

The PMC teaches people how to break down their own meat, an important element of understanding how the food system works and how we can relocalize and improve meat processing.  She’s raising funds for seeding meat collectives across America in a Kickstarter campaign, and will be discussing a forthcoming class or two planned for Eugene where YOU can learn the skills and take home pounds of premium meat.  You can watch a video of Davis on her Kickstarter page, listen to her on This American Life, or read the article that made her national news in the New York Times Magazine.

We’ll check in with Chef Gabriel Gil of the soon forthcoming and long-awaited Soubise restaurant, and sharing meals of the week. Mine came from an unexpected and marvelous gift of Oregon coast razor clams, one of the sweetest and most delicious shellfish around.  And get this, they’re free if you dig your own!  They can be prepared in many more ways than you will hear from the locals, including the way I ate them last night…

2 thoughts on “butcher your own meat, poison, and razor clams: psychopathy or just another episode of food for thought?

  1. jessica rasmussen 28 April 2013 / 10:07 am

    Love that you are showcasing a former Eugene Native, like Camas Davis.


  2. drfugawe 29 April 2013 / 4:58 am

    I’d describe her look as ‘threateningly attractive’! And I love the idea of the meat collective, for the same primary reason why I garden (to have access to resources that I’d otherwise never get). But I doubt I’d ever stretch the idea to raising my own meat – as an old farm kid, I know the downside of that – and anyone who ever raised, killed and dressed a chicken knows exactly what I mean!


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