culinaria eugenius in zurich: non-swiss miss

We celebrated my birthday by eating in a former stable.  The Reithalle Restaurant is a comfy casual beer garden-type place, with long picnic tables outside where the horses used to prance around.  Traditional Swiss dishes we consumed included:

Vegetable couscous;

Shrimp curry with raita;

Salad with pumpkin and sunflower seeds; and

Homemade pasta with gorgonzola and arugula.

Could it be that the Swiss had lost their appetite for traditional cuisine?  Nah, just the trend in cosmopolitan Europe, just as it is in cosmopolitan areas of the United States, to eat varied international dishes, often all at one restaurant.  But we weren’t satisfied until the deed was done.  Yes, even out of season, even on a summer day, fondue beats the pants off any Swiss curry:

Even with the outrageous prices one pays for a restaurant meal downtown in Zurich, none of us regretted the delicious bubbling pots of cheese — Swiss cheese, among the best in the world — at Adler Swiss Chuchi.  We ate the fondue simply with bread and Fendant, a Swiss white wine favored by Joyce and fondue eaters worldwide (if they can get it).

The Adler version was so good, we pried off the crust from the bottom of the pot.  For dessert, I tried the Emmentaler Süssmostcrème, described as an “apple juice cream Emmental style,” since I had no idea what that would be.  I must have been hitting the Fendant hard, as apple juice is on my list of the few tastes I really don’t like.  And surely I was too incapacitated to take a good picture:

But it was nice!  Like a softly set, tart-sweet apple with whipped cream.  And a specialty of the restaurant. Best of all, the company couldn’t be better.  Chatting with scholars from all over the world, eating apple juice in the only form you’ll ever eat it, cheesed up to the gills, is not a bad way to spend an evening.

Stay tuned for the next Zurich installment: Why You Should Be a Joycean and Eat Conference Food!